United States Rallies To Beat Panama, Saves Mexico’s World Cups Hopes

a 2-2 tie against Costa Rica, clinching a World Cup berth to Honduras and knocking out the Costa Ricans. The U.S. (7-2-1) and Costa Rica (5-2-3) already had clinched berths last month, and Honduras (4-3-3) earned the regions final automatic spot with a 2-2 tie at last-place Jamaica (0-5-5). Mexico (2-3-5) finished fourth with 11 points, three ahead of Panama (1-4-5). Before allowing the stoppage-time goals, Panama was even with El Tri on points and goal difference and would have reached the playoff based on a 10-7 advantage in goals scored. CARLOS JASSO/REUTERS RELATED: BRADLEY’S WORLD CUP DREAM WITH EGYPT IN TATTERS Having earned its seventh straight World Cup berth last month, the U.S. was without many of its regulars because of either injuries or decisions to allow them to return to their clubs. Among the missing were Landon Donovan, Clint Dempsey, Michael Bradley, Jermaine Jones, Tim Howard, Omar Gonzalez and Matt Besler. In all, the Americans started just two players who began the clinching match against Mexico: defender Clarence Goodson and midfielder Alejandro Bedoya. In the absence of Dempsey and Howard, Jozy Altidore captained the national team for the first time. It was an opportunity for us to see some players stepping in, Klinsmann said, Panama got the early goal when Marcos Sanchez sent a layoff to the top of the penalty area, and Torres split the defenders and easily beat goalkeeper Brad Guzan with a one-timed shot to the corner. Orozco scored his third international goal off a Davis corner kick. Sacha Kljestan was hauled down by Luis Henriquez right in front of the goal, allowing the ball to fall to Orozco.

Egypt: Relations With United States in ‘Turmoil’

The suspension, announced last week, came in response to the unrest in the wake of the July 3 military coup that ousted Mohammed Morsi, Egypt’s first freely elected president, and that led to the deaths of hundreds in police crackdowns. In an interview with state-owned Al-Ahram newspaper, Egypt’s Foreign Minister Nabil Fahmy said that there is “unrest in relations” between the two countries, warning that the strain could affect the whole Middle East region. The interview was published Wednesday. However, Fahmy said he was “not worried about this turmoil in relations,” because it’s also a chance for the two to “better evaluate their relationship in the future.” The Obama administration’s decision to cut off military aid was meant as a warning that it no longer can be “business as usual” with Cairo, as President Barack Obama put it last week. In announcing the decision, the State Department did not say how much of the $1.5 billion in annual military and economic aid to Egypt was affected. It held up the delivery of Apache helicopters, F-16 fighter jets, M1A1 Abrams tank kits, which are put together in Egyptian factories, and Harpoon anti-ship missiles. But the U.S. decision is more of a symbolic slap than a punishing wound to Egypt’s new military-backed government for its slog toward a return to democratic rule. The military-backed government enjoys the support of wealthy Gulf Arab states such as Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. These oil-rich states have poured billions of dollars into Egypt’s anemic coffers and to continue the common fight against Islamists. The U.S. also is withholding $260 million in cash assistance to the government in Cairo until “credible progress” is made toward an inclusive government set up through free and fair elections. The U.S. said it will keep providing support for health and education and counterterrorism, spare military parts, military training and border security and security assistance in the volatile Sinai Peninsula.